Forging is a manufacturing process involving the shaping of metal using localized compressive forces. The blows are delivered with a hammer often a power hammer or a die. Forging is often classified according to the temperature at which it is performed: cold forging, warm forging, or hot forging.

Forging offers uniformity of composition and structure. Forging results in metallurgical recrystalisation and grain
refinement as a result of the thermal cycle and deformation process. This strengthens the resulting steel product particularly in terms of impact and shear strength.

Forged steel is generally stronger and more reliable than castings and plate steel due to the fact that the grain flows of the steel are altered, conforming to the shape of the part.

The advantages of forging include:

  • Generally tougher than alternatives
  • Will handle impact better than castings
  • The nature of forging excludes the occurrence of porosity, shrinkage, cavities and cold pour issues.
  • The tight grain structure of forgings making it mechanically strong. There is less need for expensive alloys to attain high strength components.
  • The tight grain structure offers great wear resistance without the need to make products “superhard” We have found that, on a blank HRC 38-42 forged grinder insert wear/wash is about the same as a high alloy HRC 46-50 cast grinder insert. The difference being a HRC 46-50 casting
  • does not have the ductility to handle high impact grinding.